Tag Archive | "summer"

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TBP 0017 Chicago – A Nice Place To Visit…

Posted on 21 September 2013 by Leslie Lello

Ramlbin Chicago - 11

Yes, I know I said I would never do a podcast about Chicago, and to tell you the truth, it took me a while to figure out how to I would present the city in an honest way – both celebrating the fun of traveling as a tourist while also being forthright about my learnings from living there for over a year.

I think I achieved a good balance in TBP 0017, so if you are interested in visiting Chicago, this podcast should give you not only a great overview, but a few tips that most tourist don’t know and tour books don’t tell you.

I would love to hear feedback about this podcast.  Despite all of the trepidation I experienced before the recording, I think this is one of my better ones.  🙂

PODCAST NOTES FOR TBP 0017: Traveling in Chicago: A Nice Place To Visit But I Wouldn’t Want To Live There

Chicago Trolley & Double Decker Co.
I refer to it in the podcast as the “red bus tour”

 

Howard Johnson’s on LaSalle
I have heard the quality is questionable. I didn’t mention this hotel in the podcast and have never stayed there, but you can’t beat the parking situation and fabulous location.

 

Museum of Science and Industry

 

Architecture Tour

 

Hosteling International Chicago
There are many hostels in Chicago, but this the one I have stayed at a few times. It’s in The Loop which is the main part of Chicago.

 

Eva’s Cafe
(Near The Second City)

 

The Third Coast (Restaurant)

 

Article on the best beaches of Chicago

 

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It’s Hot, I’m Traveling with a Dog and I Have to Pee

Posted on 02 September 2013 by Leslie Lello

Leslie Lellowww.firewalkproductions.com

Imagine you are driving across Texas and it’s 110 degrees outside the car and you have to pee.

All you have to do is stop at the next service station and take care of business.

Now imagine you have a dog with you.

Not as simple, is it?

As everyone knows, it is very easy for dogs to overheat in cars, even when the temperature outside the car is a lot lower than 110.

So what do you do when you are on a road trip with your dog and you have to pee?

Here are some options

How to Take a Bathroom Break when Traveling With a Dog

Leave the Air Conditioning On While You Go Inside

In a pinch I have left the car on with the air conditioning blasting, and that seemed to work.

Obviously, you can’t be inside a long time because (1) there are laws about keeping your car running idol for too long and (2) despite the wonderful invention of air conditioning, the sun beating down can still make the inside of the car very hot.

Pee Outside

It’s probably easier for you to take a bathroom break outside with Fido if you are a guy, but again, in a pinch, I have done it.

Tie him to something in the shade

This solution isn’t an option with my dog because he hates being alone outside for even a fraction of a minute.

Also, I have heard of thieves snatching designer dogs from owners who leave them outside alone. The thief can make a lot by reselling the dog, but the duress on the owner goes much farther than the cost of the dog.

My dog is a mutt, so I’m not worried about this, but he’s also my best friend, and therefore, always at my side.

I wouldn’t recommend this option.

Bring Another Human

While I’m a big fan of the solo road trip, they can also be fun with other people.

And if you are bringing your dog with you on the road trip, having another human with you can save a lot of hassle, not only on the road, but also at hotels, stores and anywhere else your dog is not allowed in with you.

Best Choice #1: Bring the Dog Inside With You

In many of the rest stops that line America’s highways, it’s likely you will be able to sneak your dog in, especially if the entrance is on the outside of a building. I have done this numerous times, and unless there is a restaurant or food preparation going on nearby, no one should have a problem with you bringing your dog inside (unless your dog is unfriendly or loud), especially if it really is 110 degrees outside.

Even non-dog-owners know that leaving a dog in a car is a no-no and most people you meet on the road will understand why you need to bring your pooch in.

Best Choice #2: Plan Ahead

Planning ahead is not always a choice you have available when the 32 ounce big-gulp suddenly wants to leave your bladder, but that’s the point.

While it’s tough to know everything about the journey, you can research dog-friendly places that will let your dog come with you on a bathroom break, how long the trip will be vs. how long your pup can hold it, what the weather will be like and how much liquid you really need to consume during the trip.

By taking the time to think the journey through before you pull out of the driveway when traveling with a dog, you and your dog will be much more happy and comfortable.

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Travel Western Michigan Better

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TBP 0014: Western Michigan Offers Respite for City Dwellers

Posted on 31 August 2013 by Leslie Lello

Travel Western Michigan Better

South Haven, Western Michigan

As I gazed at the sunset over Lake Michigan, I marveled at how different the atmosphere was compared to when I stood at the waters from the opposite side, in Chicago. More nature. Cleaner. Peaceful. Quiet. Desolate in early spring.

These are the characteristics I yearned for during my road trips when I was living in Chicago, but the choices were never as obvious as when I lived in other major cities in the United States.

I found a piece of heaven in Western Michigan that soothed the anxiety and pressure I was constantly experiencing in Chicago.

In today’s podcast I will be talking about my weekend trip (well, mid-week trip) to Michigan to get away from Chicago. I felt much better after this excursion and think it is very important for city dwellers to get into the country and “get the city off of them” once in a while.

TBP 0014 is a shortie so it’s good if you want to squeeze a podcast in while you are driving around running errands this is a good one to pick. 🙂

Happy Travels!

PS: I brought my dog on this trip and as long as you can find a hotel that is pet friendly (I stayed in South Haven, but I understand Holland is even more dog friendly), this should be a good choice for your animal companion. He LOVED playing catch on the beach and it was completely empty so we could really spread out!

Links:
South Haven, Michigan
The Beachtowns of Michigan
Douglas, Michigan
Holland, Michigan
Pet Friendly Things To Do in Holland, Michigan

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TBP 0013 Travel Vermont: Four Wonderful Seasons

Posted on 24 August 2013 by Leslie Lello

TRAVEL VERMONT Grand Summit Hotel at Mt. Snow Vermont during the Winter X Games

Grand Summit Hotel at Mt. Snow Vermont during the Winter X Games

Most people travel Vermont in the fall because of the foliage, or during winter to go skiing.

What many people don’t know is that Vermont is a place that supports outdoor activities year round. It is definitely a state that focuses on getting out and appreciating nature, no matter what the season or weather is like.

So whatever season you find yourself in Vermont, this podcast will help you get some vacation ideas for enjoying scenery.

TRAVEL VERMONT  – TBP 0013 Pocast Notes:

ALWAYS
Shopping! Outlets in Manchester and quaint towns – in the south BRATTLEBORO, BENNINGTON, WILMINGTON.  Burlington in the north.
Spas and Retreats
Farms and excellent food
Scenic Drives (except for times in winter when roads are treacherous or Spring when roads can be too muddy)

Winter
skiing and snowboarding
snowshoeing
Indoor yoga
cross country ski
snowmobiling
Snow Tubing

Spring

Spring Skiing/Snowbarding in Early Spring
Golf (Later Spring)
Cycling (road)- maybe downhill biking later
Some hiking later in spring
The roads can be VERY MUDDY!

Summer
Swimming in pools
Swimming in lakes and reservoirs
GOLF is in “full swing”
Kayaking & Canoeing
Downhill and road biking
Hiking
Camping
Tennis
Volleyball
Waterskiing

Fall
*Foliage* First half of October, but make reservations early! Get an areal view from a chairlift or go for a scenic drive.
Hiking
Golf early in fall
Cycling (road)


LINKS:

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TBP 0010: Better Pet Travel

Posted on 03 August 2013 by Leslie Lello

pet_travel_better

I didn’t even think about pet travel when I got my first dog, but after my first trip through the desert from Flagstaff, Arizona to Venice, California, I realized that traveling with a pet takes more thought than just throwing Fido in the back seat and giving him a potty break half way to your destination.

If you don’t have a pet, some of the things I say in this podcast might relate to traveling with kids.  I don’t have kids, but I’m sure the same amount of preparation goes into baby humans as it does for baby animals.

Some of the topics I cover in the TBP0010 “Better Pet Travel” include: preparation and packing, lodging, visiting friends, driving, flying, restaurants, play and relaxation.

Three important things that I didn’t mention in my pet travel podcast:

1. Some states have seat-belt laws for dogs.  In New Jersey, if you don’t have your dog in a restraining harness when he or she is riding in the car, you could get a ticket. Plus, you always should have your dog restrained anyway because it is dangerous for both of you to not have your pet secured in some way.  I was driving 30 miles per hour with my dog, Buddha, when I first got him and he was not in a restraint.  I had to stop short and he bumped into the dashboard somewhat hard.  He’s had harder hits running into other dogs at dog parks, but it was enough to catch my attention and from that day on he was in a harness that attaches to the seat-belt of my car.

2. Regarding hotel stays with your dog: a lot of places require you to crate your dog if he or she is left alone in the room. Some don’t even allow you to leave the dog or cat alone in the room.  A crate comes in handy when leaving the animal, but is a huge pain in the butt to lug  into the hotel and takes up a lot of room in a vehicle.  I used a crate when my dog was a puppy, but as he got older I knew I could trust him if I stepped out for a short while, like going to the breakfast bar in the hotel.  I never bring a crate with me now, but I can’t recommend that to people with dogs that can be rambunctious indoors.

3. Always clean up after your dog – both inside and out.  If your dog shreds toys like mine does, pick up a majority of the fuzzes before you leave the hotel.  And always pick up your dog droppings – they attract rodents if you do not and nobody likes to walk their dog in the middle of a minefield filled with poopbombs.

Haha… I actually use the term “pet peeve” in this podcast.

Pet Travel Links:

Bring Fido: http://www.bringfido.com/

Trips With Pets: http://www.tripswithpets.com/

Go Pet Friendly: http://www.gopetfriendly.com/

Travel Pets: http://www.travelpets.com/

Luv My Pet for Affordable Pet Vaccinations (which are often required if you decide to board your pet in a kennel rather than take him or her with you): http://www.luvmypet.com/

Happy Travels!

Leslie
www.facebook.com/travelbetterpodcasts

PS: Did you enjoy this podcast and blog post about pet travel or know of someone that would enjoy it? If so, please share it with others! Thanks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About

heashot_LeslieLello

Welcome and thanks for visiting!

My name is Leslie and I am the owner, publisher and media creator of Travel Better Podcasts.

A few years ago I started traveling... (Click Here For More)


Current Location

New Jersey, USA

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